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Musée d’Orsay – Elegance and Art

July 23, 2013 @ 11:08 pm
posted by Sandra Sheridan
Paris museums

Stunning sculpture of the d’Orsay

I am drawn to sculpture, to the fluid lines, the grace and the seemingly impossible artistic mission of creating such alluring works from sometimes drab raw materials.  A favorite destination for immersion in this fine art form is the Musée d’Orsay on the banks of the Seine in Paris.

From the moment you enter, the ‘sculpture’ of the museum itself is so appealing.  We can thank historic preservationists for the transformation of the magnificent d’Orsay from the Orsay railway station to the stunning museum we enjoy today.

As the Universal Exposition neared in 1900, the French government recognized the need for a more centrally-located station than that of the Gare d’Austerlitz.  Three architects contributed to the Beaux-Arts design – Lucien Magne, Emile Bénard and Victor Laloux (the latter designed the extraordinary station clock that looks over the grand hall of the museum), who were challenged to integrate the new station into its elegant environs.

“The station is superb and looks like a Palais des beaux-arts…” – painter Edouard Detaille, 1900

Clearly they accomplished their goal, but plans for an expansive modern hotel complex threatened its destruction.  Fortunately revived interest in 19th-century architecture generated a declaration of the d’Orsay as a Historical Monument in 1978, when a commission was established to create the museum.

The sculptures of the Musée d’Orsay

The debut of the museum in December 1986 included 1,200 sculptures, mostly from the former collections of the Musée du Luxembourg, the Louvre and from state loans.   The 19th century marked a prolific period for sculpture.  Then the ‘mood’ of the people sought to proclaim triumphant social progress, while the politicos wanted to carve their beliefs in bronze and stone.

Musee d'Orsay, Paris

View from D’Orsay rooftop

Fortunately, we are able to enjoy the many legendary works of art under the changing daylight that streams through the museum’s glass roof.   Among the diverse sculpture collection are Rodin’s The Age of Bronze, Bourdelle’s head of Beethoven, works by Belgian sculptor Constantin Neunier and Edgar Degas’ enchanting Small Dancer.

Over three-and-a-half million visitors enjoyed the Musée d’Orsay in 2012, a number that continuously increases over time.  If you haven’t had the opportunity to join those fortunate visitors, we suggest you rectify that oversight on your next visit to Paris!

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